‘Voices’ against Contamination in waste paper import: Policy ‘framework’ may push Indian Paper Mills in trouble

Total Views : 647
Zoom In Zoom Out Read Later Print

News about increasing waste paper imports to India carrying contamination may create an environmental problem like China.Policy ‘framework’ may push Indian Paper Mills in trouble

‘Voices’ against Contamination in waste paper import: Policy ‘framework’ may push Indian Paper Mills in trouble

Ghaziabad | 27, December 2018, The Pulp and Paper Times:

China’s like environmental issues may arise in India very soon. Dumping of contaminated waste paper at Indian sea port is surging multi-fold day by day. Some section of Indian Paper Industry is raising voice against the contamination in waste paper import and demanding to the government to discourage import of contaminated paper and come out with policy framework and regulations.

“India has been witnessing an unprecedented rise in dumping of hazardous waste paper due to a ban on these materials in China. This has also disincentivised the segregation and recycling of solid waste in India, leading to loss of livelihood across the waste management value chain,” said Sanjay Singh, Divisional Chief Executive, Paperboards and Specialty Papers, ITC Ltd.  

“If Governments comes up with any policy framework to curb the waste paper import, it will badly disturb the paper mills’ production. We need imported high grade waste paper like DSOCC 11 for making high strength paper which has to be imported from South Africa and United State (US) due to low recovery rate of recycle fibre in India. Any policy regulation to control the waste paper import will drop the Export surge of paper significantly. If we save more than $180 million in mixed waste imports, on other hand, we lose million dollars on account of export of paper,” said by a India Paper mill owner.

The one more solid reason behind soaring waste paper import is to diluting or sorting out the contamination in waste paper here in India by local importers for exporting it back to China at higher prices.

The Indian Agro and Recycled Paper Mills’ Association has sought policy support to increase the recovery rate of waste paper for recycling by paper mills. P.G. Mukundan, secretary general of the association, said though paper consumption in the country is about 18 million tonnes, recovery of waste paper is just 35-38%. In countries such as Japan, the recovery is almost 80%

“Our Industry is too heavily dependent on the waste paper or recycles fibre, the availability, which is very limited therefore we required to import huge quantity of waste paper. The recovery rate in our country is only 27% as against the consumption of nearly 18 million tonnes. There is a need to improving recovery rate, for which Government - Centre and Sate as well municipal corporation need to work as whole. Paper industry should also be careful what they are importing, like trash and very inferior grade which might lead to serious complication in terms of environmental concern” said Mr. Sivashanmugaraja IAS, Managing

‘Voices’ against Contamination in waste paper import: Policy ‘framework’ may push Indian Paper Mills in trouble  

Ghaziabad, 27 December 2018, The Pulp and Paper Times: China’s like environmental issues may arise in India very soon. Dumping of contaminated waste paper at Indian sea port is surging multi-fold day by day. Some section of Indian Paper Industry is raising voice against the contamination in waste paper import and demanding to the government to discourage import of contaminated paper and come out with policy framework and regulations.

“India has been witnessing an unprecedented rise in dumping of hazardous waste paper due to a ban on these materials in China. This has also disincentivised the segregation and recycling of solid waste in India, leading to loss of livelihood across the waste management value chain,” said Sanjay Singh, Divisional Chief Executive, Paperboards and Specialty Papers, ITC Ltd.  

“If Governments comes up with any policy framework to curb the waste paper import, it will badly disturb the paper mills’ production. We need imported high grade waste paper like DSOCC 11 for making high strength paper which has to be imported from South Africa and United State (US) due to low recovery rate of recycle fibre in India. Any policy regulation to control the waste paper import will drop the Export surge of paper significantly. If we save more than $180 million in mixed waste imports, on other hand, we lose million dollars on account of export of paper,” said by a India Paper mill owner.

The one more solid reason behind soaring waste paper import is to diluting or sorting out the contamination in waste paper here in India by local importers for exporting it back to China at higher prices.

The Indian Agro and Recycled Paper Mills’ Association has sought policy support to increase the recovery rate of waste paper for recycling by paper mills. P.G. Mukundan, secretary general of the association, said though paper consumption in the country is about 18 million tonnes, recovery of waste paper is just 35-38%. In countries such as Japan, the recovery is almost 80%

“Our Industry is too heavily dependent on the waste paper or recycles fibre, the availability, which is very limited therefore we required to import huge quantity of waste paper. The recovery rate in our country is only 27% as against the consumption of nearly 18 million tonnes. There is a need to improving recovery rate, for which Government - Centre and Sate as well municipal corporation need to work as whole. Paper industry should also be careful what they are importing, like trash and very inferior grade which might lead to serious complication in terms of environmental concern” said Mr. Sivashanmugaraja IAS, Managing Director of Tamil Nadu Newsprint and Papers Ltd.  

“In the absence of adequate availability of raw materials for the paper industry, India has to depend heavily on imports to meet its growing requirements. The mills now import 4.5 million tonnes of waste paper a year, mostly from the U.S., the European Union, and west Asian countries. The total requirement of waste paper is estimated between 10 million and 11 million tonnes a year.

The mills should have continuous supply of waste paper, as that is the raw material. There should not be any ban on imports,” Mr. Mukundan added.

“The governmental agencies are mandated to take appropriate steps to promote the small players so that a sustainable market is developed for them. Several provisions have been made for waste recyclers, ragpickers (informal waste collectors), composting units and waste-to-energy plants. The agriculture ministry promotes compost manure through fertiliser control order. It also provides recycling units and waste-pickers with easy access to segregated recyclable waste such as paper, plastic, metal, glass, textile from the source or material recovery facilities,” Said Dr Harsh Vardhan, minister for environment and forests in an Interview to The week.

“In the absence of adequate availability of raw materials for the paper industry, India has to depend heavily on imports to meet its growing requirements. The mills now import 4.5 million tonnes of waste paper a year, mostly from the U.S., the European Union, and west Asian countries. The total requirement of waste paper is estimated between 10 million and 11 million tonnes a year. said by Director of Tamil Nadu Newsprint and Papers Ltd.

The mills should have continuous supply of waste paper, as that is the raw material. There should not be any ban on imports,” Mr. Mukundan added.

“The governmental agencies are mandated to take appropriate steps to promote the small players so that a sustainable market is developed for them. Several provisions have been made for waste recyclers, ragpickers (informal waste collectors), composting units and waste-to-energy plants. The agriculture ministry promotes compost manure through fertiliser control order. It also provides recycling units and waste-pickers with easy access to segregated recyclable waste such as paper, plastic, metal, glass, textile from the source or material recovery facilities,” Said Dr Harsh Vardhan, minister for environment and forests in an Interview to The week.

See More

Latest Photos